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Radios Of The 2010 First Final Farewell DX Contest
Contest Entrants

Page 3

Sean Whiteacre, Hobby Class Entry

Radios Of The 2010 First Final Farewell DX Contest Contest Entrants

Radios Of The 2010 First Final Farewell DX Contest Contest Entrants

Radios Of The 2010 First Final Farewell DX Contest Contest Entrants


The radio is a Westinghouse Aeriola, Jr. I did not use a regular diode, but the real detector on the radio. The "Perikon" detector uses two rather rare minerals; Bornite in the fixed cup and Zincite in the movable section. Anyways I used the Perikon Detector. I also used the original 1921 C.Brandes Superior headphones from 1921.. Antenna was 25 ft in air and 150 ft long, Inverted L type.


Kevin Norton, Open Class, Loop Class and Active Device Class

I used the K-3 Big Litz Dx Set for the Open Class. It was the same set up as last year. For the Loop Class, I used a low Q loop built on cardboard box.

The Active Device Class entry was a WN6Q MPF-102 Regen (Via Owen Poole). I originally tried this as a double tuned set using 2x 660/46 ferrite assisted air coils, 4 gang ceramic wiperless variable caps, and a Litz air tickler. The regen set worked well, but was very hard to line up and very touchy. When the antenna tank was removed the set worked MUCH better! It still WAS a regen, and therefore still had a few flukes. It was MUCH more tamed, and Dxing became much easier.

The sets radiation was read off of my Icom R-70, so digital spotting was a snap. The final version was a single tuned tank of a ferrite assisted air coil, a 4 gang ceramic wiperless and crystal earphones in parallel. The antenna was VERY lightly coupled via a few insulated turns of a gimmick capacitor. At times, I could zero beat the set simply by turning my head a bit to one side!

I copied SOMETHING ( anything from beat notes to ear splitting locals) on nearly EVERY frequency out of the 119 channels. Maybe 90 stations or more of at least very weak audio or better.

FWIW, I made a big boo-boo and left the set in place during a vicious white out snow squall. We had very high winds and blizzard type of snowfall rates. The antenna kept discharging arcs every 5 or 10 seconds. They could be heard in the next room. By the time I realized what was going on, it was too late. I pulled the antenna line off and measured the arcs, which by that time were down to around 3/4". To fry the set in the position it was in, they had to have been at around TWO inches (30 Kv??) to bypass the gimmick cap twists and leap to the set. Needless to say, a new FET had to be installed. Live and learn.



Glen Yarbro, Open Class

Radios Of The 2010 First Final Farewell DX Contest Contest Entrants

Radios Of The 2010 First Final Farewell DX Contest Contest Entrants

The set used was a Litz Special, modified to Dave Schmarder's #44 wiring configuration. The antenna was 250 feet long and 30 feet high. The ground consisted of two 8 foot ground rods.

The set used an 1N34A diode and 4K Navy hadphones. No wave traps were used. The spotter radio was a Realistic DX-60 with a frequency counter.


Continued on Page 4.